Distance Learning Class & Lab Series - Kentucky Science Center
Science Travels to You

Distance Learning Class & Lab Series

Science Travels to You

Distance Learning Class & Lab Series

Connect with Kentucky Science Center through live video-conferencing. Each series includes three sessions: an introduction, investigation, and conclusion, plus a material list and a teacher guide.

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Pre-K to Grade 12
  • Class (Pre-K to Grade 5)
    First session 20 min
    Second session 45 min
    Third session 20 min
    $200 per series
  • Lab (Grade 6-12)
    First session 30 min
    Second session 60 min
    Third session 30 min
    $200 per series

Classes (Pre-K to Grade 5):

Shapes & Stuff

Turn shopping into a learning experience that sets important foundational skills in math and science as well as learning and reading.

Turn shopping into a learning experience that sets important foundational skills in all curriculum areas, from math and science to language and reading. Using carefully designed shopping lists; young “shoppers” will explore concepts such as same and different, sorting, categorizing, counting, comparing, and organizing.

Students participating in Shapes & Stuff will:

  • develop questions about what shapes build our world.
  • identify, sort, classify, and organize shapes and colors based on their characteristics.
  • collaborate in teams to develop a creation out of shapes.

Kentucky Academic Standards:

KECS Kindergarten 1st Grade 2nd Grade
ELA 2.1, 2.2
Science 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5 K-2-ETS1-2 K-2-ETS1-2 2-PS1-1, 2-PS1-3
Math 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4 MP.2, MP.4, MP.5
Health and PE 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5

Organisms and Ecosystems

Students develop a model for how adding a playground in a park could have minimal human impact on an ecosystem.

What happens when a playground is built in a park? Keeping in mind the movement of matter between animals and their environment, develop a model explaining how a playground could have minimal human impact on an ecosystem. Students will need to clearly argue their solution, using evidence from investigations.

Students participating in Organisms and Ecosystems will:

  • engage in questioning in order to understand the relationship between different organisms within a park environment.
  • identify problems that arise from human intrusion in park ecosystems.
  • develop a model that mimics the function of an animal dispersing seeds in order to support the claim that playgrounds should be minimally invasive to a park ecosystem.
  • conduct investigations in order to construct arguments supporting the notion that organisms are adapted to their specific environment.
  • using a playground as an example, gather data regarding human impact and develop systems to reduce that impact.

Kentucky Academic Standards:

KECS Kindergarten 1st Grade 2nd Grade 3rd Grade 4th Grade 5th Grade
ELA 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 3.5, 4.2 W.K.2, SL.K.5 W.1.8 W.2.7 RI.3.3 W.4.1 RI.5.7
Science 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5 K-SL1-1, K-ESS2-2, K-ESS3-1, K-ESS3-3 1-LS1-1 2-LS2-2, K-2-ETS1-1 3-LS4-3, 3-LS4-4 4-LS1-1 5-LS2-1, 3-5-ETS1-2
Math K.MD.A.2 MP.5 MP.4, MP.5 MP.4 4.G.A.3 MP.2, MP.5
Social Studies 1.2, 1.6 2.19 2.19 2.19 2.19 2.19 2.19
Health and PE 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4

Energy In Motion

Students generate and evaluate possible options for renewable energy in Kentucky based on its unique criteria and constraints.

Can Kentucky support turbines or other types of renewable energy? Generate and compare multiple possible options for renewable energy in Kentucky based on given criteria and constraints. Ask questions to determine if electric and magnetic forces that power turbine technology are effective alternatives to conventional methods.

Students participating in Energy in Motion will:

  • ask questions, make observations, and gather information about renewable energy in Kentucky in order to develop a new or improved electricity-generating device.
  • obtain and evaluate information to describe how energy and fuel are derived from natural resources and how their use affects the environment.
  • analyze data to determine how the push and pull of forces could increase turbine output.
  • develop a simple model of a turbine in order to illustrate how the shape of the blades increase or decrease its rotations per minute.
  • draft a simple turbine design, applying scientific concepts about magnetism; provide evidence suggesting that a magnetic field exists between two objects, even when the objects are not in contact.
  • generate and compare multiple possible solutions for renewable energy in Kentucky and construct explanations based on how likely to meet criteria and constraints.

Kentucky Academic Standards:

KECS Kindergarten 1st Grade 2nd Grade 3rd Grade 4th Grade 5th Grade
ELA 1.2, 2.1 SL.K.5 SL.2.5 W.2.8 RI.3.3 W.4.7, W.4.8 RI.5.7, W.5.8
Science 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5 K-PS2-2 K-2-ETS1-2 K-2-ETS1-1 3-PS2-4 4-PS3-4, 4-ESS3-1 3-5-ETS1-2
Math 2.MD.D.10 MP.5 MP.2, MP.4 MP.2, MP.5
Social Studies 2.18, 2.19 2.18, 2.19 2.18, 2.19 2.18, 2.19 2.18, 2.19 2.18, 2.19

Our Dynamic Earth

Students explore how different earth systems like weather, climate, and other phenomena support life and change our landscape over time.

How do different earth systems interact to create a balanced planet that supports life? How do weather, climate, and earth processes change our landscape? What evidence do we have that Earth has changed over time? Students explore these phenomena and brainstorm different solutions to the damaging effects that often happen when earth systems react. This program is presented in partnership with WLKY.

Students participating in Our Dynamic Earth will:

  • ask questions, make observations, and gather data about the effects of earth processes and the importance of weather forecasting as it relates to farms and cities.
  • use and share observations of local weather conditions to describe patterns over time and provide evidence of the effects of weathering and erosion by water, ice, wind, or vegetation.
  • develop a model in order to describe ways in which the geosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact.
  • generate and compare multiple solutions to reduce impacts of natural Earth processes, like wind and weather, on humans.
  • make a claim about the merit of your design solution and its ability to reduce the impact of weather-related hazards on either a city structure or a country farm.

Kentucky Academic Standards:

Kindergarten 1st Grade 2nd Grade 3rd Grade 4th Grade 5th Grade
ELA SL.K.3 W.2.8 RI.2.3 W.3.7 W.4.7 SL.5.5
Science K-ESS2-1, K-ESS3-2 K-2-ETS1-1 2-ESS2-1 3-ESS3-1 4-ESS2-1, 4-ESS3-2 5-ESS2-1
Math MP.4 MP.2 MP.2 MP.4 MP.2, MP.4

Transformation of Matter

Students will investigate and observe different materials to determine which substances will result in a biodegradable material.

As we keep adding to landfills, scientists are testing new types of materials that are biodegradable. Students will test biodegradable and non-biodegradable materials to determine their characteristics, and then conduct investigations and make observations in order to determine whether or not mixing substances will result in a biodegradable material.

Students participating in Transformation of Matter will:

  • ask questions, make observations, and gather information about the structure and properties of matter.
  • define the problem: how do we reduce the amount of materials in a landfill?
  • plan and conduct an investigation to describe and classify materials based on their properties.
  • plan and execute material testing, with controlled variables, in order to identify aspects of a prototype to determine if it fits the criteria and constraints of a biodegradable material.

Kentucky Academic Standards:

Kindergarten 1st Grade 2nd Grade 3rd Grade 4th Grade 5th Grade
ELA W.2.6 W.2.6 W.2.7 W.5.8 W.5.8 W.5.8
Science K-2-ETS1-1 K-2-ETS1-1 2-PS1-1 3-5-ETS1-3 3-5-ETS1-3 5-PS1-4
Math MP.4 MP.2 MP.2 MP.2
Social Studies 2.18 2.18 2.18 2.18 2.18 2.18

Our Universe

That’s one giant leap for your students as they step into the boots of an astronaut to learn about the universe.

That’s one small step for man and one giant leap for your students as they step into the boots of an astronaut to learn about the universe. How do astronauts on the ISS investigate nearby planets and asteroids? What will it take to get a satellite into orbit? This class is a perfect complement to a mission at the Challenger Learning Center.

Students participating in Our Universe will:

  • develop investigative questions related to how our moon, satellites, and stars move in the galaxy.
  • construct a model in order to make sense of the patterns observed.
  • conduct investigations to explain how planets orbit around the sun.
  • use data to imagine and construct different projects for space exploration.

Kentucky Academic Standards:

Kindergarten 1st Grade 2nd Grade 3rd Grade 4th Grade 5th Grade
ELA W.2.8 W.1.8 RI.5.7 RI.5.7 RI.5.7 RI.5.9
Science K-2-ETS1-2 1-ESS1-1, 1-ESS1-2 3-5-ETS1-1 3-5-ETS1-1 3-5-ETS1-1 5-PS2-1
Math MP.5 MP.2  MP.2  MP.2  MP.4
Social Studies 2.19, 2.20 2.19, 2.20 2.19, 2.20 2.19, 2.20 2.19, 2.20 2.19, 2.20

Design Your Own Class

Work one-on-one with an educator to develop a hands-on curriculum that meets your learners’ specific needs.

Don’t see the class you need? Work one-on-one with one of our educators to develop a hands-on curriculum that meets your learners’ specific needs. Some examples of topics? Nature, weather, and nutrition, and more! All topics will be considered, but we cannot guarantee the ability to facilitate the request. Certain requests may require an additional fee.

Kentucky Academic Standards:

K-2nd Grade 3rd-5th Grade
Science K-2-ETS1 3-5-ETS1

Labs (Grade 6 to 12):

Our Universe

That’s one giant leap for your students as they step into the boots of an astronaut to learn about the universe.

That’s one small step for man and one giant leap for your students as they step into the boots of an astronaut to learn about the universe. How do astronauts on the ISS investigate nearby planets and asteroids? What will it take to get a satellite into orbit? Guided by a Science Center Educator, students work through these questions, discovering the fundamental role which gravity plays in defining the complex motions of our solar system.

Students participating in Our Universe Classes will:

  • analyze data to support the argument that gravitational force directed “down.”
  • develop a model describing the role of gravity in the solar system.
  • evaluate satellite designs and determine how well those designs meet the criteria and constraints of a planet’s gravitational pull.

Kentucky Academic Standards:

6th Grade 7th Grade 8th Grade High School
ELA SL.8.5 WHST.6-8.9 WHST.6-8.9
Science 6-ESS1-2 MS-ETS1-2 MS-ETS1-2 HS-ESS1-4
Math MP.4 MP.2 MP.2 MP.2
Social Studies 2.19, 2.20 2.19, 2.20 2.19, 2.20 2.19, 2.20

Energy In Motion

Students generate and evaluate possible options for renewable energy in Kentucky based on its unique criteria and constraints.

Theme parks offer thrills and chills, but what are the laws of physics that power your favorite ride? Applying science and engineering, students will design, evaluate, and refine three typical theme park rides that will minimize their danger and maximize fun.

Students participating in Energy in Motion will:

  • develop investigative questions about the possible forces at work when two objects collide.
  • construct a model identifying and interpreting the physical properties at work in a given theme park ride.
  • conduct an investigation using electromagnets in order to evaluate the safety mechanisms on a ride.
  • analyze data to determine similarities and differences among several rides and identify the best characteristics of each that could be combined into a new ride.

Kentucky Academic Standards:

6th Grade 7th Grade 8th Grade High School
ELA RST.6-8.3 WHST.6-8.7 RST.6-8.9 WHST.9-12.7
Science 06-PS2-1 07-PS2-5, MS-ETS1-2 MS-ETS1-3 HS-PS2-3
Math MP.2 MP.2 MP.2 MP.4
Social Studies 2.16 2.16 2.16 2.16

Organisms and Ecosystems

Students develop a model for how adding a playground in a park could have minimal human impact on an ecosystem.

Observe and investigate, gathering relevant date, in order to design, evaluate, and refine a
solution for reducing the impacts of human activities within a park environment. Based on
evidence, construct an explanation for how human impact may also affect an ecosystem’s
biodiversity and can lead to changes of adaptations within that population.

Students participating in Organisms and Ecosystems will:

  • refine questions and develop an investigative model that describes the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
  • define problems arising from humans intrusion on an ecosystem, specifically, a nearby park. Develop a system model in order to make sense of the complexities of organism relationships.
  • conduct investigations in order to identify the cause and effect of habitat and adaptation changes over time.
  • from evidence, develop arguments about how to prevent human impacts within an ecosystem as it relates to a park or playground

Kentucky Academic Standards:

6th Grade 7th Grade 8th Grade High School
ELA RST.6-8.7 WHST.6-8.2 WHST.6-8.7 WHST.9-12.2, WHST.9-12.9
Science 6-LS2-1, 6-LS2-3 7-LS1-6 8-ESS3-3 HS-LS2-7, HS-LS4-4
Math 6.EE.C.9 6.EE.C.9 7.EE.B.4 MP.2
Social Studies 2.19 2.19 2.19 2.19

Our Dynamic Earth

Students explore how different earth systems like weather, climate, and other phenomena support life and change our landscape over time.

How do different earth systems interact to create a balanced planet that supports life? How do weather, climate, and earth processes change our landscape? What evidence do we have that Earth has changed over time? Students explore these phenomena and brainstorm different solutions to the damaging effects that often happen when earth systems react. This program is presented in partnership with WLKY.

Students participating in Our Dynamic Earth will:

  • develop a model to describe Earth’s environmental cycles in order to make sense of their effects on cities and farms.
  • as it relates to cities or farms, plan and conduct investigations on the properties of water and its effects on Earth processes.
  • analyze and interpret data relating to natural hazards to forecast and inform the development of technological advances for farms or cities.
  • define the criteria and constraints of a farm or city design, taking into account data collected on natural hazards and their potential impact on people and the natural environment.
  • evaluate technological solutions for farming or city building based on the established criteria.

Kentucky Academic Standards:

6th Grade 7th Grade 8th Grade High School
ELA WHST.6-8.9 RST.6-8.1 RST.6-8.7 WHST.9-12.7
Science 06-ESS2-1 MS-ETS1-1 8-ESS3-2 HS-ESS2-5, HS-ETS1-3
Math MP.2 MP.4
Social Studies 2.18, 2.19 2.18, 2.19 2.18, 2.19 2.18, 2.19

Transformation of Matter

Students will investigate and observe different materials to determine which substances will result in a biodegradable material.

As we keep adding to landfills, scientists are testing new types of materials that are biodegradable. Students will test biodegradable and non-biodegradable materials to determine their characteristics, and then make conduct investigations and make observations in order to determine whether or not mixing substances will result in a biodegradable material.

  • develop models to describe the atomic composition of simple molecules and extended structures. Communicate the atomic characteristics of biodegradable materials.
  • analyze and interpret data on the properties of different substances before and after they interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred.
  • evaluate competing materials to determine how well they meet the criteria and constraints of a biodegradable material.

Kentucky Academic Standards:

6th Grade 7th Grade 8th Grade High School
ELA RST.6-8.7 RST.6-8.1 RST.6-8.1 WHST.9-12.2
Science 06-PS1-1 07-PS1-2 MS-ETS1-2 HS-ESS3-4
Math MP.2 MP.2 MP.2 MP.2
Social Studies 2.18 2.18 2.18 2.18
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Name That Part

Choose an organ – sheep brain, cow eye, pig lung, sheep kidney, or sheep heart – and discover the link between anatomy and physiology.

You choose which organ you would like to study — sheep brain, cow eye, pig lung, sheep kidney, or sheep heart — and discover the link between anatomy and physiology. Book multiple labs to cover the body from head to toe. Compare real-world advances of technology in the biomedical field to the organs your students explore.

Kentucky Academic Standards:

Middle School High School
ELA RST.6-8.1 WHST.9-12.9
Science MS-LS1-2 HS-LS1-2, HS-LS1-3
Math MP.2 MP.2
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Whose DNA?

Step into a forensics lab to analyze DNA from a hypothetical crime scene.

Step into a forensics lab to analyze DNA from a hypothetical crime scene. Learn how forensic analysts solve mysteries, by using micro-pipetting skills to run DNA samples using gel electrophoresis.

Kentucky Academic Standards:

High School
ELA RST.6-8.3
Science HS-LS1-1, HS-ETS1
Math MP.2

Design Your Own Lab

We can design a custom lab that explores your desired theme and focuses on engineering practices of the NGSS.

Don’t see a topic that fits your needs? Tell us what you have in mind and we’ll design a lab that explores your theme and focuses on engineering practices of the NGSS. All topics will be considered; if we can’t facilitate your specific request, we will work with you to develop alternatives. Certain requests may require an additional fee.